CONTACT INFORMATION

 

U.S. Embassy in Taiwan
Consular Section
Immigrant Visa Unit, 3rd Floor
American Institute in Taiwan
Number 7, Lane 134
Hsin Yi Rd, Section 3
Taipei 106, Taiwan
Tel: (886) 02-2162-2005
Fax: (886) 02-2162-2253
Email: visaiv@mail.ait.org.tw

Taiwan’s Adoption Authority
Children’s Bureau (Er Tong Ju), Ministry of Interior
7F, No. 503 Li-Ming Road, Section 2
Nantun, Taichung 408, Taiwan
Tel: (04)-2250-2850
Fax: (04)-2250-2903
Internet: http://www.cbi.gov.tw

Embassy of Taiwan
Taiwan Economic and Cultural Representation Office (TECRO) in the United States
4201 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20016
Tel: (202) 895-1800
Email: tecroinfodc@tecro-info.org  


*Taiwan also has offices (consulates) in: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Guam, Honolulu, Houston, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Francisco and Seattle.


Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
2201 C Street, NW
SA-29
Washington, DC 20520
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
E-mail: AskCI@state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures, call the National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).

Taiwan Flag
Taiwan

Map of Taiwan

 

Taiwan is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Taiwan did not change.

The United States does not have formal diplomatic relations with Taiwan. All Consular and other representative functions are handled by the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT), a non-profit, private corporation authorized by the Taiwan Relations Act to conduct and carry out programs, transactions, and other relations between the United States and Taiwan.

Updated:
November 2006

DISCLAIMER

 

WHO CAN ADOPT

To bring an adopted child to United States from Taiwan, you must be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn more.

In addition to these U.S. requirements for adoptive parents, Taiwan also has the following requirements for adoptive parents:

  • Residency Requirements: There are currently no residency requirements that prospective adoptive parents must meet in order to adopt an orphan from Taiwan.
  • Age Requirements: Prospective adoptive parents must be at least twenty years older than the child to be adopted. If married however, the other parent must be at least 16 years older than the adopted child.  Taiwanese regulations further stipulate that adopting parents must be adults not older than 55 years of age.
  • Marriage Requirements: A married person who adopts a child shall do so jointly with his/her spouse.
  • Income Requirements: Prospective adoptive parents must have a stable residence, legitimate work and sufficient financial means.

 

WHO CAN BE ADOPTED

A child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law for you to bring him or her home back to the United States. Learn more about these U.S. requirements.

In addition to these requirements, Taiwan has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption. You cannot adopt a child in Taiwan unless he or she meets the requirements outlined below.

Eligibility Requirements:

  • No child adopted may be:
    • Directly related by blood to the prospective adoptive parents;
    • Directly related by marriage, except in the adoption of the other spouse’s child as a stepchild; or
    • Indirectly related by blood or marriage, such as cousins (unless removed by a certain degree), the spouse of a sibling, or a sibling of your spouse. (Taiwan law is very detailed about what degree of indirect blood relation is excluded from adoption. If prospective adoptive parents are concerned about possible blood ties with the child they wish to adopt, they should contact AIT for clarification before proceeding with the adoption.)

 

  • Waiting Period: The average time to complete an international adoption in Taiwan is approximately 10 months from initial contact with the adoption agency in the U.S. until the immigrant visa is issued.

 

HOW TO ADOPT


Taiwan’s Adoption Authority
Children’s Bureau (Er Tong Ju), Ministry of Interior

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Taiwan generally includes the following steps:

1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider
2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
3. Be Matched with a Child
4. Adopt the Child in Taiwan
5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption
6. Bring Your Child Home

1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider

The first step in adopting a child from Taiwan is usually to select a licensed agency in the United States that can help with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. Learn more about choosing the right adoption service provider.

2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt

To bring an adopted child from Taiwan to the United States, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt (Form I-600A) by the U.S. Government, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn how.

In addition to meeting the U.S. requirements for adoptive parents, you need to meet the requirements of Taiwan as described in the Who Can Adopt section.

3. Be Matched with a Child

If you are eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, the central adoption authority in Taiwan will provide you with a referral to a child. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of a particular child and provide a permanent family placement for the referred child.

The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Taiwan’s requirements, as described in the Who Can be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law. Learn more.


4. Adopt the Child (or Gain Legal Custody) in-country

The process for finalizing the adoption (or gaining legal custody) in Taiwan generally includes the following:

  • Role of The Adoption Authority: Although the Children’s Bureau is Taiwan’s Adoption Authority, as soon as prospective adoptive parents arrive in Taiwan, they should contact AIT’s Consular Section to register their presence in Taiwan:

    Consular Section
    Immigrant Visa Unit, 3rd Floor
    American Institute in Taiwan
    Number 7, Lane 134
    Hsin Yi Rd, Section 3
    Taipei 106, Taiwan
    Fax: (886) 02-2162-2253
    Email: AitAdoptions@state.gov
  • Role of The Court: All applications for adoption are first submitted to the Taiwan District Court.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: Most adoptions are processed through local orphanages identified by U.S. or other foreign-based adoption agencies.
  • Adoption Application: An application for adoption is first submitted to the Taiwan District Court. After one to two months, the adoptive parent(s) or a designated representative will receive a notice to appear. During this waiting period, a Taiwan social worker from the local bureau of social affairs or a designated agency will review the foreign (U.S.) home study. After the hearing, the court will rule on the adoption (usually within two months) and publish a final ruling three weeks later.

    The third step is to register the adoption at the Taiwan Registrar’s office by submitting the original court ruling, final ruling, and the power of attorney certified at the Taiwan Foreign Affairs Police Station at the Taiwan Registrar’s office. This usually takes only one hour.
  • Time Frame: The average time to complete an international adoption in Taiwan is approximately 10 months from initial contact with the adoption agency in the U.S. until the immigrant visa is issued.
  • Adoption Fees: The following fees apply to adoptions in Taiwan:
    • Court processing fee – US $5
    • Taiwan passport application fee (regular fee) – US $30
    • Expedited application – US $70
    • Taiwan Household Registry (HHR) application fee – US $ 0.30 per copy (All Taiwanese citizens are part of an efficient household registry system that tracks events such as births, deaths, marriage, and divorce)
    • Translation fees – VARIABLE
    • Notary fees – US $25 per document
  • Documents Required: After a child has been identified, the prospective parents must submit the following documents to the Taiwan authorities to process the local adoption:
    • Power of attorney, in English and Chinese, appointing the Taiwan orphanage or social worker to represent them;
    • U.S. home study and Chinese translation;
    • Evidence of prospective adoptive parents’ right to adopt in the United States (included in U.S.-certified home study);
    • I-797 approval notice of I-600A from DHS;
    • Copy of U.S. prospective adoptive parents’ home state adoption laws and Chinese translation;
    • Signed adoption agreement notarized by the TECO (Taipei Economic and Cultural Office) having jurisdiction over the place of the parent(s)’ residence (in English and Chinese); and
    • Other documents (birth certificates, marriage certificates, etc.) may be requested by the orphanage, agency, or Taiwan authorities.

*Chinese translations prepared in the United States must be certified by the TECRO/TECO office for that district and English versions must be notarized by a U.S. notary public.


5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption

After you finalize the adoption (or gain legal custody) in Taiwan, the U.S Government, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) MUST determine whether the child is eligible under U.S. law to be adopted (Form I-600). Learn how.


6. Bring Your Child Home

Now that your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), there are a few more steps to take before you can head home. Specifically, you need to apply for several documents for your child before he or she can travel to the United States:

Birth Certificate
You will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child, so that you can later apply for a passport. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

Taiwan Passport
Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or Passport from Taiwan.

U.S. Immigrant Visa
After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to apply for an U.S. visa from the United States Embassy for your child. After the adoption (or custody for purpose of adoption) is granted, visit the U.S. Embassy for final review and approval of the child’s I-600 petition and to obtain a visa for the child. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the “Panel Physician’s” medical report on the child if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Learn more.

 

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your new child to acquire American citizenship automatically when he or she enters the United States as lawful permanent residents.

For adoptions finalized in the United States: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your new child to acquire American citizenship automatically when the court in the United States issues the final adoption decree.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible. Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

Learn more about the Child Citizenship Act.



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TRAVELING ABROAD


Applying for Your U.S. Passport

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Taiwan. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining Your Visa

In addition to a U.S. passport, you also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are attached to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.

To find information about obtaining a visa for Taiwan, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it's always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The State Department is a good place to start.

The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to register your trip with the Department of State. Travel registration makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there’s a family emergency in the United States, or a crisis in Taiwan, registration assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Registration is free and can be done online.

 

AFTER ADOPTION


What does Taiwan require of the adoptive parents after the adoption?

Taiwan requires five years of post-placement reports. In the first year, post placement reports are required at three, six and twelve months; after that one report per year is required. (This means seven reports over a five-year period.) The reports, which include photos of the child, must be completed by licensed social workers or agencies through home visits.

We strongly urge you to comply with the wishes of Taiwan and complete all post-adoption requirements in a timely manner. Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to Taiwan’s history of positive experiences with American parents.


What resources are available to assist families after the adoption?

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it’s another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some good places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.


Comments on this Adopt                                                     page 1 of 1
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Audel
Posted 1023 days ago
As Chlarie Sheen says, this article is “WINNING!”